Daniel L. Reminga, D.P.M., F.A.C.F.A.S.
Foot Doctor Houghton, MI
801 Memorial Rd.
Houghton, MI 49931 US
906-482-9950
 

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By contactus@northernfootandankle.com
October 31, 2017
Category: Uncategorized
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Many adults experience heel pain however, heel pain isn’t a condition that’s often associated with young children. In children, SEVER’S DISEASE, also referred to as Calcaneal Apophysitis, is a heel pain condition. Dr. Reminga, at Northern Foot Care Center, has talked about adult heel pain in past shows. Today, he defines the condition in children. What is Sever’s disease? It isn’t really a “disease” but more of a condition often due to overuse. Dr. Sever first reported it in 1912 as an inflammation of the apophysis, causing discomfort to the heel, mild swelling, and difficulty walking in growing children. An apophysis is an area of growth cartilage found throughout a child’s body and serves as an attachment site for their muscles and tendons. When a child is diagnosed with Sever’s Disease, they have an irritation of this area of growth cartilage in the heel’s growth plate where the Achilles tendon attaches.

Sever’s Disease can be misdiagnosed, Dr. Reminga states, if not evaluated carefully. He presents an example of this when referring to a young patient he evaluated recently. The condition usually occurs between the ages of 8-14 with a higher incidence in boys typically. Dr. Reminga continues to describe the symptoms of Sever’s Disease and the misdiagnosis of “growing pains” that can occur if not diagnosed properly. He discusses the treatment options and the repercussions if not treated correctly. Listen to today’s program so you can understand Sever’s disease and how it affects children.

Dr. Daniel Reminga's Weekly Radio Show "Your Feet Your Health" airs every Wednesday at 10 am & 5 pm on WKMJ 93.5FM, WMPL 920AM, WUPY 101.1FM radio. Listen to past recordings here.

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